ENGG1811 Lab 08: Simulation and its applications

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ENGG1811 Lab 08: Simulation and its applications
Objectives
After completing this lab, students should be able to
Write Python scripts, functions and for-loop
Understand and use the following Python numpy package features: array, array indexing, max, min,
where
Gain a better understanding of simulation and how it can be used for design and decision making
Assessment
This lab has four parts: Parts A to D. The four parts together form a sequence of tasks. These parts are not
independent and should be done one after another.
You need to show your tutors all the four parts. Remember you must be ready for some assessment half
an hour before the end of the class. These three exercises are worth 2 marks.
For all the programs, we expect that you choose informative variable names and document your program.
There is also an online assessment question which is worth 1 mark. We suggest that you attempt this
question after completing all the parts.
Organising your work
You should make a directory called lab08 to store your files for this lab.
Introduction:
Imagine a mobile phone game where you use a strawberry launcher to feed an alien. Your goal is to feed
as many strawberries to the alien in as little time as possible. Technically speaking, the problem to solve
is, for a given location of the alien, what launch speed and launch angle will minimise the travel time of
the strawberries from the launcher to the alien.
Remark: The real-life application of this problem is missiles. For this lab, let us be innocent and consider
strawberries and aliens instead.
The starting point of simulation is mathematical modelling. In ENGG1811, we will always give you the
mathematical models. After you have learned enough knowledge in your own discipline, you will be able
to come out with your own mathematical model for the work that you do.
The motion of the strawberries in the air is affected by two factors: gravitational pull and air resistance. A
common model for air resistance is that the resistive force is proportional to total speed of the object. We
assume the launcher, strawberries and alien live in a two-dimension space. The horizontal direction is the
x-direction and the vertical direction is the y-direction. The position of the strawberry is therefore defined
by its x- and y-coordinates. We use px(t) and py(t) to denote the x- and y-coordinates of the strawberry at
time t. In addition, we use vx(t) and vy(t) to denote the velocity of the strawberry in x- and y-directions.
The motion of the strawberry obeys the following set of ordinary differential equations:
where m and c are, respectively, the mass and drag coefficient; and g is the acceleration due to gravity.
Since the strawberry has an x- and a y-component in velocity, its total speed is given by the square root of
(vx(t)2 + vy(t)2). If you are interested, Equations (3) and (4) are derived from Newton’s Second Law.
Equation (3) says that the strawberry experiences resistance as it moves in the air in the x-direction.
Equation (4) says that the strawberry experiences both gravitational pull and air resistance when it moves
in the y-direction.
Given Equations (1)-(4), you can use Euler’s forward rule to derive how to calculate the position and
velocity at time t + Δ from that at time t. We have derived the equations for you, as follows:
Let us assume that you use the Python numpy 1-dimensional arrays position_x, position_y,
velocity_x and velocity_y to store the coordinates and velocities of the strawberry at different time
instances. Equations (5) and (7) mean that you will be updating the elements of the arrays position_x
and velocity_x using these Python statements:
position_x[k] = position_x[k-1] + velocity_x[k-1] * dt
speed_total = math.sqrt(velocity_x[k-1]**2+velocity_y[k-1]**2)
velocity_x[k] = velocity_x[k-1] – c*speed_total*velocity_x[k-1]/m*dt
where dt in the Python statements is the time increment, which is denoted by Δ in the mathematical
equations. Essentially you identify px(t) with the position_x[k-1], px(t+ Δ) with the position_x[k] etc.
You are asked to work out the other Python statements for updating the elements of the arrays
position_y and velocity_y.
Part A: Simulation
Download the zip file which contains the files sim_projectile_partially_done.py and
test_sim_projectile.py, and move them to the directory lab08 that you have created earlier. The file
sim_projectile_partially_done.py contains a Python function to simulate the motion of the
strawberry. First, rename the file as sim_projectile.py. This is so that if you, for some reason, need to
download the file again, the newly downloaded file will not overwrite the work that you have.
The file sim_projectile.py contains the function sim_projectile whose first and last lines are:
def sim_projectile(time_array,m,c,v0,theta0d):
return position_x, position_y
where time_array is a 1-D numpy array containing time instances, m is mass, c is drag coefficient, v0
is initial launch speed, theta0d is launch angle in degrees. This function returns two outputs, which are
the x- and y-coordinates at the corresponding time instances specified by the numpy array time_array.
The function is missing two lines of code (within the for-loop located near the end of the function), which
are the two Python statements for updating position_y and velocity_y. You are asked to fill in these
two statements at the places indicated. You may wish to read the function to see what it does. In
particular, note that v0 is the initial total speed, which means the initial speed in the x- and y-directions,
are, respectively v0*math.cos(math.radians(theta0d)) and
v0*math.sin(math.radians(theta0d)).
After you have completed this, you can test the function by using the Python script
test_sim_projectile.py. Take a look at what the script does. It defines the problem and simulation
parameters, as follows:
time starts at 0 and ends at 10 with an increment of 0.01
m = 0.145
c = 0.0013
v0 = 50
We will not change these parameters for this lab.
For this part, you can use theta0d = 35. We will use a range of values for theta0d later on.
If you’ve added the correct Python statements, then a plot of the x- and y-coordinates of the strawberry
should look like this the graph on the right. If you get a flat line at the zero level, then your program is still
incomplete.
Part B: Determine the landing distance and landing time
The simulation in Part A allows you to determine the trajectory of the strawberry launched at a given
speed and angle. Let us now assume that the alien is located at a height (y-coordinate) of +10, and the
alien’s can only swallow the strawberries when they are falling down. The trajectory plot in Part A shows
that, with a launch angle of 35 degrees, a rough estimate of the landing position of the strawberries will be
at the coordinates (96,10). This position is obtained from using visual inspection from the graph. Your
task for this Part is to use Python to automatically determine the landing position (assuming a landing
height of 10) as well as the time to reach the landing position, from the trajectories computed in Part
A.We will define the exact meaning of landing using an example in a moment.
We will give you some idea how you can use Python to find the landing time and position. The trajectory
has 501 numbers so they may be hard to work with. So we will use a small example to illustrate the
method. This is a typical problem solving technique. If you can solve the problem for a small example,
then you can transfer the solution to a larger instance of the problem. Let us assume that you have three
arrays px, py and tv, which have analogous meaning to position_x, position_y and time_array that
we have used above. We made up some values for the elements of these three arrays:
tv = np.array([ 0.6, 0.7, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8, 1.9])
px = np.array([ 2.4, 2.9, 5.7, 6.6, 7.5, 8.4, 9.3])
py = np.array([ 9.7, 10.1, 10.5, 10.2, 10.1, 9.9, 9.8])
Note that this example contains the main feature of the problem with the positions in the y-direction
dropping from a value above 10 to a value below 10. It means that at some point in time, the strawberry
has a height of exactly 10. Instead of determining the exact time of crossing, we use an approximation
here. First, we consider only the time instances in the array tv. Second, we say that landing occurs at time
t if the vertical position of the strawberry at time t is closest to the level of 10, but is still at or above the
level of 10. For this example, landing occurs at time instant 1.7 because the strawberry is just above the
level 10, at a height of 10.1 to be specific. At the next time instance, at time 1.8, the strawberry is below
the level of 10, at 9.9 to be specific. This is not exact, but if the time increment is small, the error will not
be big. (This is also on the condition that the alien opens its mouth wide!) We say that the landing distance
(which measures position in the x-direction) is 7.5 and the landing time is 1.7.
We suggest that you work with this example first to find out what Python statements you need to
determine the landing distance and landing time from tv, px and py. Once you get this going, you can
test whether it works for the time_array, position_x and position_y. If you want some more hint,
you can click here.
You can use any method to solve this problem as long as it can be automated. Having done some
programming, you may think that you need some loops and if statements to solve this problem. Yes, you
can do that, but I want to say that this problem has some special features and you can solve this problem
using the Python numpy functions numpy.where and numpy.max. If you do not know how to use
these functions, see these examples and/or you can look at the help pages of these functions. Also, we
discuss the function numpy.where in the Week 6’s lecture, an example code is here.
You should try to do this Part using a script, because you will need to write a function to do these steps in
Part C. You can keep the script to show your tutor.
Part C: Write a function to determine the landing distance and landing time
Once you have got Part B working, you should write a function to determine the landing distance and
landing time (these are the outputs) from the 1-d arrays time_array, position_x and position_y and a
scalar landing_level (these are the inputs). Note that landing_level is 10 but we should try to make
the function general so that it can work with any landing level.
The first and last line of your function should look like:
def find_landing_pos_time(time_array,position_x,position_y,landing_level):
return landing_position, landing_time
You can insert your code in the file sim_projectile.py. The outline for the function can be seen in the
sim_projectile.py file under your sim_projectile function. Un-comment this section and then write your
code in the space.
You can test your find_landing_position_time function in the console. Try running
sim.find_landing_pos_time(time_array,position_x,position_y,10)
in the console and look at the output. Compare it to your graph you made earlier, does the answer seem
correct?
Part D: Determining the launch angle to feed the alien in a minimum time
First, let us recap what you have achieved by now.
For a given launch angle, the function sim_projectile gives you position_x and position_y
(Part A)
From time_array, position_x and position_y, the function find_landing_pos_time gives
you landing_position and landing_time (Part C)
By combining what you have in Parts A and C, you can determine, for a given launch angle, what the
landing position and landing time are. What this means is that, you have all the functions that you need to
study how the launch angle impacts on landing position and landing time.
In this part, your task is to write a Python ssccrriipptt that does the following:
Create a 1-dimensional numpy array that starts with 20 and ends at 60 at an increment of 1. This
array contains all the launch angles that you want to use. We will call this array angle_array but
you should come out with a better variable name.
Hint: You do not need for-loops to generate this array. A numpy function can do the work for
you. See the file numpy_ex.py in Week 7’s lecture.
Create two zero 1-dimensional arrays that have the same shape as angle_array. These arrays will
be used to store the landing distances and landing times for different launch angles.
Hint: A numpy function will do the work for you. See the file numpy_ex.py in Week 7’s
lecture.
For each of the launch angles, you want to:
Simulate to obtain the trajectory. You can use the same parameters as Part A.
Determine the landing distance and landing time for the trYou can test your
find_landing_position_time function in the console. Try
running sim.find_landing_pos_time(time_array,position_x,position_y,10) in the
console (you should be able to copy and paste it) and look at the output. Compare it
to your graph you made earlier, does the answer seem correct?”ajectory assuming a
landing height of 10
Store the calculated landing distance and landing time in the arrays that you have created
This script does some calculations repeatedly so you need some type of loops (which type?). Once you get
your script working, you can plot a graph of landing distance versus landing time. You should get a graph
similar to that below.
Let us assume that the alien is at a horizontal distance of 90 from the launcher. You can see from the graph
that there are two launch angles that will allow you to feed the alien and one of them will allow you to
feed the alien quicker. Your final task is to determine the launch angle to use by using Python statements.
You can add these statements to the script and write a Python print statement to display the answer. We
do not need a very accurate answer. As long as the launch angle is within 1 degree of the correct value,
that is acceptable. You can use any method you like to determine the launch angle. The type of method
you used in Part B is also helpful here.
— Happy feeding! —
At the End of the Lab
You should be able to show your tutor the three exercises. You should be comfortable with using for-loops
and list of lists.
Finally, do not forget to complete your online multiple choice question if you have not done it yet.
If you have completed everything, please do not forget to logout. Simply double click on the “Log Out”
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