Unit Guide: COMM150 Culture, Media and Communication Implementation Date: Session 3 2017

Unit Guide: COMM150 Culture, Media and Communication
Implementation Date: Session 3 2017
1
Unit Code
COMM150
Unit Title
Culture, Media and Communication
Session
Session 3 2017
Program(s)
Diploma of Arts (core and capstone unit)
Diploma of Communication (core and capstone unit)
Pre-Requisites:
None
Credit Points
3 credit points
Duration
1 session
Unit Coordinator
Dr Beate Mueller
Document modified:
01 October 2017
Teaching Team:
Contact details and consultation hours of lecturers and tutors will be advised in class and via the SIBT Learning
Site at the beginning of session.
Name
Email address
Dr Beate Mueller beate.mueller@learning.sibt.nsw.edu.au
Unit Guide: COMM150 Culture, Media and Communication
Implementation Date: Session 3 2017
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1. Welcome
1.1 Purpose
In this capstone unit, we will investigate the role of communication, culture, and the use of media and utilise our
new knowledge and skills to create a public relations campaign. In the first module, you will explore how
communication and culture shape our identity, and the way we communicate and think about the world in
different contexts. You will also learn about different research methods in the field of communication and culture
and apply some of them yourself. The second module takes us into the world of public relations where you will
receive insight into how public relations use previously discussed forms of communication to communicate with
publics. In small groups, you will create your own public relations campaign that you will present in a showcase at
the end of the session. In the third module, we will look at the field of social semiotics and explore how we draw
meaning from objects, words, texts, images, and other media resources around us. We will explore semiotic
principles and dimension and apply them to advertisements, public spaces, in an excursion to the Museum of
Contemporary Art, and from the perspective of media journalists, artists, advertisers and public relations
practitioners. You will create a video or posters that go along with your public relations campaign. Theoretical
knowledge and practical experience will be applied through conducting interviews, analysing media content, and
producing the aforementioned public relations campaign. Furthermore, this capstone unit offers a creative
environment for you to integrate your previous diploma subjects, draw on historical and contemporary cultural
experiences, and practise knowledge through the differing expressive modes of writing, photography and digital
media.
1.2 Student Workload
There are four timetabled contact hours each week and you are also expected to complete the weekly COMM150
readings. Students whose English is well developed should schedule approximately three hours to complete the
reading task. In addition, allow another hour per week for reading quality newspapers, watching news and current
affairs programs, and analysing public relations campaigns. Finally, you should also set aside at least 2 hours a
week for assessments. The total workload is therefore 10 hours per week. Students whose English language
skills are still developing should allocate additional time.
The expected student workload per week for this unit comprises of (10 hours total):
Lecture 2 hours
Tutorial 2 hours
Personal Study 6 hours
Total: 10 hours
1.3 Mode of Delivery
This unit is a face-to-face unit comprising 4 contact hours per week. Critical thinking and rational informed debate
is encouraged during in-class discussions. Additionally, you are expected to conduct research, participate in field
studies, analyse a wide range of media content, actively produce digital content and propose a public relations
campaign with the aim of encouraging healthy national and international participatory public spheres.
1.4 Learning Support
SIBT is committed to providing additional academic assistance to students to maximise their opportunity to
successfully complete units of study. Learning Advisors conduct regular workshops in skill areas essential to
studies. These include: time management, goal setting, essay preparation, examination techniques, academic
writing skills and Maths. Further information on programs available can be accessed on the SIBT Learning Site
or by asking the SIBT staff on reception.
Unit Guide: COMM150 Culture, Media and Communication
Implementation Date: Session 3 2017
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1.5 Specialist Facilities
No access to specialist facilities and/or equipment is required for this unit.
2. Academic details
2.1 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
1. Evaluate different communication models and concepts;
2. Analyse advertisements, art works and images by drawing on semiotic analysis;
3. Work as a group to develop a public relation campaign proposal using digital media;
4. Synthesise the key concepts to produce an engaging presentation.
2.2 Graduate Signature Capabilities
SIBT programs are designed to develop a set of capabilities that will assist graduates in further studies or the
workforce.
1. Discipline Knowledge and Skills
-articulating basic facts, concepts and rules of discipline practice
-applying theories and procedures to real or hypothetical scenarios
-making links between theory and practice (developing professional identify/ judgement)
2. Organisation Skills
-developing skills of a self-directed learner, taking responsibility for planning and goal setting,
time management
-being systematic in finding, summarizing, organising and referencing sources of information for
a purpose
-completing tasks successfully on time and with given resources
3. Critical Thinking Skills
-diagnosing and solving problems by identifying requirements
-researching, analysing and evaluating information
-combining processes and ideas to propose solutions, integrative thinking)
4. Collaboration Skills
– working with others respectfully, ethically and positively
– negotiating roles, responsibilities, contributions
– contributing discipline knowledge and interpersonal skills to team outcomes
5. Communication Skills
-conveying ideas effectively in English, appropriate for academic or professional contexts
-choosing appropriate tools, technologies and formats
-structuring and presenting an argument in written, visual or verbal forms
Unit Guide: COMM150 Culture, Media and Communication
Implementation Date: Session 3 2017
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Specifically, this unit prioritises the following signature capabilities evaluated in the assessment tasks in section
2.5:
1. Discipline Knowledge;
2. Organisational Skills;
3. Critical Thinking Skills;
4. Collaboration Skills;
5. Communication Skills.
2.3 Weekly Teaching Schedule
Wk
Lecture Topic and Tutorial Activity
Online & Personal Study /
Assessment
1
Module 1 (Week 1 to Week 4)
The first module of this unit will concentrate on four major areas in
the study of communication: identity, ethics, culture, and group
communication.
Identity, Society, and Communication
In this first lecture, we will begin to explore aspects of identity and
communication and the role of society in the development of both
aspects, and more closely explore four aspects of identity
development. We will learn about how identity is shaped by
communication and vice versa. Then we will think about how
communication influences how we understand different aspects of
identity, i.e.gender.
In the tutorial, we will first go through the unit outline including the
unit content, assessment tasks, unit schedule and contact details.
We will then reflect on how our own identities impact on our
communication and ways of meaning making.
Access: to SIBT Learning
Site
Find: the unit outline, lecture
slides, assignments and
weekly readings online
Reading:
Alberts JK, Nakayama TK,
Martin, JN 2016, Human
Communication in Society’ 4th
ed. Pearsons Education,
Upper Saddle River, NJ.
Chapter 3.
2 Human Communication and Ethics
In today’s lecture, we will start by drawing on your previous
knowledge of human communication and the communication
process. We will then discuss different aspects of ethical
communication, what different approaches to communication
ethics there are, and why ethics is important. Together, we will
look at different campaigns and case studies.
In the second part, we will explore three different research
paradigms in the field of communication and culture and try to
evaluate different case studies in terms of their research
approach.
Reading:
Alberts JK, Nakayama TK,
Martin, JN 2016, Human
Communication in Society’ 4th
ed. Pearsons Education,
Upper Saddle River, NJ.
Chapters 1 + 2.
3 Communication and Culture
In the lecture, we will learn about different cultural value
paradigms drawing on your knowledge from previous classes. We
will help each other to learn about values of our cultures/countries.
We will also try to criticise these paradigms and see how they
apply to our lives and society.
In the second part, we will explore concepts such as cultural
sensitivity and competence and actively try to work on our
Reading
Alberts JK, Nakayama TK,
Martin, JN 2016, Human
Communication in Society’ 4th
ed. Pearsons Education,
Upper Saddle River, NJ.
Chapter 8.
Unit Guide: COMM150 Culture, Media and Communication
Implementation Date: Session 3 2017
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intercultural competence.
In the tutorial, we will draw on these concepts and take some
surveys to explore our cultural values and intercultural
competence. We will try to analyse intercultural encounters
critically. But first, you will present your interview research and
interview questions and conduct a small pilot study in class.
4
Intergroup Communication
Not just in this course, but in most study and work contexts, you
will be asked to work in small groups. Having essential skills of
conflict resolution, team work, and leadership facilitates these
processes and will lead you to successful group projects.
In the lecture, we will learn about these aspects theoretically and
the difference between task and relational communication.
Moreover, we will learn what our personal roles in group work
could be and how we can positively influence related processes
such as problem-solving and decision-making.
In the tutorial, we will explore different aspects of successful group
communication in more depths and try to come up with concrete
tips that everyone can apply. Post these tips on our SIBT learning
platform. We will also look at different conflict case studies and
discuss about different ways of solving these problems.
You should also decide on the format of your campaign proposal
(AT2) due in week 9:
(a) Video
(b) Brochure
(c) Poster
Decide on the type of campaign. What issue will your group
address?
Reading
Alberts JK, Nakayama TK,
Martin, JN 2016, Human
Communication in Society’ 4th
ed. Pearsons Education,
Upper Saddle River, NJ.
Chapter 10.
Online Quiz due (AT1)
5 Module 2 (week 5-8) Public Relations
The second module of this unit will focus on public relations as
communication.
Introduction to Public Relations
This week, we will give an overview of essential basics you need
to know about effective public relations. We will start with an
overview of the module to connect you with what you have learned
in the past two modules. We will begin to understand public
relations as a form of planned persuasion through our
conceptualisation of PR, and review major theories and the
historical development. Bearing this knowledge in mind, we will
continue to obtain the insights of current digital economy and
essential skills to succeed as PR professionals.
This week’s tutorial will begin by having a look at several other
campaigns related to our second assessment. In your groups, you
will then start to formulate your campaign’s topic and goals.
Reading
Coombs, T.W. & Holladay,
S.J.2013, ‘Does Society Need
Public Relations?’, In It’s not
just PR: Public relations in
society (2nd ed.), United
States: Wiley, John & Sons,
pp.4-35.
6 Campaign Strategy and Tactics
In this week, we will deepen our understandings and sharpen our
skills to develop a successful campaign strategy and a reasonable
plan. We will begin to identify publics and establish intelligence of
stakeholders. On the basis of mapping out the typology of PR
Reading
Harrison, K. 2008, ‘The
Communication Plan’.
In Strategic public relations: A
practical guide to success (5th
Unit Guide: COMM150 Culture, Media and Communication
Implementation Date: Session 3 2017
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campaigns, we will learn to draft an effective campaign plan. This
will lead us to further explore those required tactics so you can
implement the campaign plan.
In this week’s tutorial, we will embark on drafting your proposal for
the second Assignment. In groups, you will develop and outline
your campaign proposal further.
ed.), Perth W.A.: Century
Consulting Group, pp.98-144.
7 Crisis communication and issues management in a
socially mediated world
This week, we will unpack causes of crisis in our society and
potential solutions that PR professional can provide through
issues management. We reflect on how a given crisis is possibly
prevented in an increasingly complex world. Drawing from
campaign proposals discussed last week, we will continue to learn
to maintain an effective communication during a crisis with
external and internal stakeholders. In the end, we will critically
review ethical considerations to address expectations from various
stakeholders.
In this week’ tutorial activities, you will first complete an individual
work: identify the issues in your campaign proposal and draw a
strategic issues priority matrix. Then in groups, you will come up
with a media plan with your team members to channel welldefined
messages to address these issues facing your selected
target stakeholder.
Reading
Newsom, D., Van Slyke Turk,
J, & Kruckeberg, D. 2013,
‘Crisis and Credibility’ in This
is PR: The realities of public
relations (11th ed.), Boston,
MA: Wadsworth, Cengage
Learning, pp.313-354.
8 Evaluating the Impacts of PR campaigns
This week, we will have an opportunity to learn about how to
evaluate the impact of a PR campaign in the real world. While
carrying this criterion in mind, we will examine cases of PR
campaigns with a focus of developing public relations with
governments, corporations, NGOs, and other third parties. We will
conclude with current challenges of the PR industry and the
shaping of the future
In this week’s tutorial we will help you to shape your campaign
proposal. Please have a first draft of your PR proposal ready for
peer review.
Reading
Atkin, C., & Freimuth, V 2013,
‘Evaluating Communication
Campaigns’ in Public
Relations Handbook.
Thousand Oaks: SAGE,
pp.83-97
9 Module 3 (Week 9 to Week 14)
The third module of the course will focus on social semiotics.
Social Semiotic Principles
We will kick off this third module by reactivating previous
knowledge on semiotics and learning about social semiotics in
particular. We will then explore different principles of social
semiotics, such as semiotics resources, semiotics change,
semiotic rules and semiotics functions. We will apply these
categories to different aspects of social semiotics to see the
salience of semiotics in our everyday lives.
In the tutorial, we will use our knowledge about social semiotics to
analyse different spaces on campus. We will also brainstorm idea
Readings
Van Leeuwen, T 2005,
Introducing Social Semiotics.
Routledge. London. Part 1:
Semiotic Principles pp. 1-89.
Van Leeuwen, T 2006,
Towards a semiotics of
typography, Information
Design Journal + Document
Design 14(2), pp. 139-155.
Please find more readings on
SIBT Learning
Unit Guide: COMM150 Culture, Media and Communication
Implementation Date: Session 3 2017
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on how advertising can be transformed these days and we will try
to create a semiotic inventory of an everyday product.
PR Campaign Proposal and
Media Release (AT2) due
10-
11
Study Break (prepare your creative output)
12 Dimensions of Semiotic Analysis
In this lecture, we will go deep into the topic of semiotic analysis to
prepare for our second assessment. We will explore the concepts
of discourse, genre, style and modality and see their application
on visual semiotics. You will be able to apply these concepts to
your daily lives as well as to advertisements and campaign
posters.
In the tutorial, we will prepare for the second assessment by
analysing campaigns in terms of this week’s concepts to better
understand the messages behind your own campaign.
Readings
Van Leeuwen, T 2005,
Introducing Social Semiotics.
Routledge. London. Part 2:
Dimensions of semiotic
analysis, pp. 91-178.
O’Toole, M 2011, ‘The social
semiotic and the viewing
subject in The language of
display art (2nd ed.),
Routledge, London, pp.150-
164.
Please find more readings on
SIBT Learning
13 Multimodal Texts
This week, we will focus on multi-modal forms of communication
and ways of making meaning. You will discover how within a given
social-cultural domain, the ‘same’ meanings can often be
expressed in different semiotic modes. We will examine how
different kinds of semiotic resources such as rhythm, composition
and dialogue are integrated to form multimodal text and how text
and images are linked to convey information.
We will apply our new knowledge to different campaigns and
layout styles and analyse how they create meaning.
Readings
Van Leeuwen, T 2005,
Introducing Social Semiotics.
Routledge. London. Part 3:
Multimodal cohesion, pp. 179-
268.
Kress, G and Van Leeuwen, T
2001, Multimodal discourse –
The modes and media of
contemporary communication,
Arnold, London, pp. 1–23.
Najafian, M & Ketabi, S 2011,
Advertising Social Semiotic
Representation:
A Critical Approach,
International Journal of
Industrial Marketing 1(1), pp.
63-78
Please find more readings on
SIBT Learning
14 Excursion
This week, we will together go on an excursion to the Museum of
Contemporary Art at Circular Quay, a central cultural institution in
Sydney.
During the field trip, you must collect multimedia examples and
data in the form of photographs, videos and written field notes.
On our multimodal tour, you should try to ask yourself the
following questions:
What different forms of multimodal artworks are in the museum?
What different forms of mediums are used and what do they
represent? Do the different modes work together to convey
meaning? Is it easy to understand the meaning behind most of the
Museum of Contemporary
Art website and mobile app
Unit Guide: COMM150 Culture, Media and Communication
Implementation Date: Session 3 2017
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2.4 Recommended readings
Alberts JK, Nakayama TK, Martin, JN 2016, Human Communication in Society’ 4th ed. Pearsons Education,
Upper Saddle River, NJ.
Demetrious, K 2013, Public relations, activism, and social change – speaking up, Routledge, London.
Denton, P 2000, ‘Writing your release’ in How to write and pitch your press release, Pearson Education Australia,
NSW, pp. 26-43.
Heath, R 2010, The Sage Handbook of public relations, Sage, US.
Holtzhausen, D 2007. Activism, in E. Toth (ed.) The future of excellence in public relations and communication
management, Mahwah, NJ. Lawrence.
Kress, G and Van Leeuwen, T 2001, Multimodal discourse – The modes and media of contemporary
communication, Arnold, London, pp. 1–23.
L’Etang, J., McKike, D., Snow, N. & Xifra, J. (eds), The Routledge Handbook of Critical Public Relations,
Routledge, London, pp. 335-348.
Mahoney 2008 ‘Presentations’ in Public relations writing in Australia, Oxford University Press, Australia. pp. 107-
108.
Morris, T & Goldsworthy, S 2011, PR today – the authoritative guide to public relations, Palgrave Macmillan:
London.
Najafian, M & Ketabi, S 2011, Advertising Social Semiotic Representation:A Critical Approach, International
Journal of Industrial Marketing 1(1), pp. 63-78
Van Leeuwen, T 2005, Introducing Social Semiotics. Routledge. London.
2.5 Assessment
Assignment/ Assessment Task (AT)
Week of
Assessment
Weighting
Learning
Outcomes
Assessed
SIBT Signature
Capabilities
Online Quiz (AT1)
(Individual)
Week 4 15% 1
1,2,3,5
art works? How did you manage to understand them? You should
also consider who or what is included, or excluded from the
gallery’s representations? For example, does the gallery represent
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures? Who is the intended
audience/s? What did these representations mean to you?
This week’s tutorial will take the form of a rehearsal for your group
presentations. Please bring your slides and presentation materials
to class after the excursion.
Semiotic Analysis (AT3) due
15 Public Relations Campaign Proposal Submission and Group
Presentation Showcase
In this last class, you will present your PR campaign creative
output
Group presentations (AT4)
Unit Guide: COMM150 Culture, Media and Communication
Implementation Date: Session 3 2017
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Public Relations Campaign Proposal and
Media Release (AT2)
(Group assignment)
Week 9 30% 2
1,3,5
Semiotic Analysis and Creative Output (AT3)
(individual)
Week 14 40% 1,2,3,4
1,2,3,4,5
PR Campaign Pitch (AT4)
(Group assignment, oral presentation)
Week 15 15% 3,4 2,4,5
Assessment Task Details
Assessment Task 1: Online Quiz (15%)
This assignment is to test your knowledge and understanding of the lecture content and the readings of the first
four weeks on the topic of communication. You will find the online quiz on our Moodle site under Assessments.
You have 15 minutes to complete the 15 multiple-choice questions. To prepare for this assessment, regularly
attend classes, do the readings and revise the lecture slides. This assessment is individual.
Assessment Task 2: Public Relations Campaign Proposal and Media Release (30%)
Topics:
Choose one of the following scenarios:
1) Imagine that you are a public relations consultant for a national campaign to change public behaviour on
an issue of national or international interest. You have been hired to design an innovative and
effective communication campaign that will achieve this outcome.
2) Imagine that you are a public relations consultant for an activist group. You have been hired to design
an innovative and effective communication campaign to promote its social profile and enhance its cause
in domestic and international contexts.
3) Imagine that you are a public relations consultant that was hired by the City of Sydney. Your job is to
create an innovative and effective communication campaign to successfully promote the city’s national
and international reputation and image.
This assignment task consists of a PR Proposal as an overview of your PR campaign AND a brief media release.
Working in a small group, you must imagine yourself as a PR consultant for an organisation. You are required to
design a public relations campaign on the topic (above) that you chose in week 3. The proposal should be 1200
words (+/- 10%) long and should contain the following parts:
 Executive Summary
 Situation and Background Analysis (Literature review)
 Goals and Objectives
 Target Publics
 Key Messages
 Communication and Event Strategies and Tactics
 Timeline (very brief)
 Evaluation
 Conclusion
 Media release
The situation analysis should include background information on the topic/issue as well as some relevant studies
and findings on the topic accompanied by a reference list. Specifics of the content will be further discussed in
class and you will find exemplars and further readings materials on SIBT Learning.
To facilitate group work, we’re encouraging the active use of Google classroom for this assessment as well as
assessment 4.
Unit Guide: COMM150 Culture, Media and Communication
Implementation Date: Session 3 2017
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Media Release: A Media Release on the campaign should be attached to the proposal (last page, same
document). The Media Release should briefly introduce the what, when, where, who, why, how of the launch and
tactics of the campaign. It should be roughly 150 words long and written in the form of an actual news article. Use
an interesting and catch title and try to get the reader interested in your campaign. You will be shown examples
in class.
Please also see the marking criteria on SIBT Learning.
Assessment Task 3: Semiotic Analysis and Creative Output (40%)
This assessment requires students to:
 Develop the creative material for their PR campaigns (video or brochure (one per group or posters (one
per group member) This can be done individually or as a group.
 Think about and analyse your multimodal semiotic campaign elements
 Write a semiotic analysis (800 words) analysing and interpreting the semiotics of your campaign
materials (1 poster/image per student or one specific part of the video per student)
Step 1: Create your campaign material
You should either create a
(a) 2-3 minute long video,
(b) a brochure (6-sided folded A4 paper), or
(c) posters (1 per student or more).
The images/footage must be taken by the group members . Videos and posters should then be edited to add
captions, a logo, slogan, music, additional information etc. The use of apps and software to create videos and
images is strongly encouraged (e.g. iMovie, Windows Movie Maker, Screencastomatic, Pixlr, canva.com, Splice,
scrap book making apps etc.)
Step 2: Analysis and report
How does your campaign create meanings? The semiotic analysis must contain reference to semiotic theory and
apply semiotic terminology to explain how your creative output creates meaning. Analyse your creative campaign
output by using the visual and written social semiotic dimensions of discourse, genre, style, modality, multimodal
meanings, text/picture linkage and other dimensions discussed in this module.
Write an analysis on your campaign material including how you composed and linked words, images, voice,
music etc. to convey your key messages to your target audience. Further, discuss how your campaign represents
the issue, how your campaign constructs an imaginary relationship between the viewer and the image, and how
well the use of multimodality contributes to the overall meaning of your campaign?
Your analysis should have an introduction that briefly introduces your campaign, the publics and key messages
and what materials you developed. The main part should also contain references to semiotic theories,
explanations on the multimodal semiotic features used and semiotic terminology. The semiotic analysis of your
campaign material should be the focus of this assessment. Conclude with a short discussion of the impact of the
campaign. Please attach your campaign material (paste your poster or insert YouTube link to video) in the
appendix of this assessment and don’t forget a complete reference list (minimum of 3 academic sources).
The completed semiotic analysis must be around 800 words in total (you can write more, but not less). You
should create your video, posters or brochure together as a group and make sure this creative output is coherent.
The written analysis, however, is an individual task and each group member has to write their own analysis. You
can focus only on one of the posters or a specific part of your video. Each group member must analyse a
different poster or part. Please attach images of the posters or brochure to the report or upload your video on
YouTube (as unlisted) and insert the link in your analysis report
Please also see the marking criteria on SIBT Learning.
Unit Guide: COMM150 Culture, Media and Communication
Implementation Date: Session 3 2017
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Assessment Task 4: Pitching your PR campaign and creative material (15%)
The last assessment is a group presentation, which weights 15%, due in the last week of the semester. Each
group will be given 20 minutes (including presentation of their creative output) to present their PR campaign.
Pretend you are now pitching your PR campaign to the client. Students should find a creative and engaging way
to present their campaign (background information, target publics, objectives, key messages, strategies, tactics
etc.). Students are encouraged to illustrate their PR campaign in an interesting format using slides and
illustrations. The presentation should also contain the PR materials (videos, posters, brochure) but focus on
presenting the campaign as a whole. Students will be marked individually, so make sure each student received
equal speaking time.
Please also see the marking criteria on SIBT Learning.
2.6 Submitted assessments
Students must submit an electronic copy of any assessment task worth >10%. Submission method is via Turnitin
on SIBT Learning.
Assessments that are to be submitted as hard copy submissions need to be handed to the relevant teaching staff
Students must keep a backup soft copy of the assessment. The submitted assessment requirements apply to
the following assessment:
Assessment Task: Online Quiz
Due: Week 4, starts after class
WEIGHTING: 15%
Hand in: Online Quiz on SIBT Learning
Assessment Task: PR Proposal and media release (one per group)
Due: Week 9, before lecture
WEIGHTING: 30%
Hand in: Upload on SIBT Learning via Turnitin (COMM150)
Assessment Task: Semiotic Analysis (including creative PR materials)
Due: Week 14, before lecture
WEIGHTING: 35%
Hand in: Upload on SIBT Learning via Turnitin (COMM150)
All digital files should have the following naming conventions:
Unitcode_classgroup_StudentID_assessmenttask.fileextension
Sample:
COMM150_Gp1_SDZQ1202_SemioticAnalysis.pdf
2.7 Satisfactory completion of the unit
To satisfactorily complete the unit, you must:
 satisfactorily attempt ALL assessment components; AND
 obtain an overall passing grade for the unit.
3. Additional Unit Information
Unit Guide: COMM150 Culture, Media and Communication
Implementation Date: Session 3 2017
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3.1 SIBT Policies and Procedures
For details on SIBT’s Policies and Procedures please refer to the SIBT Student SIBT Learning Site:
http://www.sibt.nsw.edu.au/policies
3.2 Special Consideration
SIBT recognises that a student’s performance in assessment tasks or examinations may be affected by
compassionate or compelling circumstances. Special Consideration Policy allows for reasonable adjustment to
the standard assessment requirements and ensures equitable assessment for all students.
The Special Consideration circumstances surrounding disruption to study must be of at least three (3)
consecutive days duration, or an acute instance within a study period, and prevent completion of an assessment
task or final examination.
For more information please refer to SIBT’s Special Consideration Policy: http://www.sibt.nsw.edu.au/policies
3.3 Grades
Final marks and grades are subject to confirmation by the SIBT Examinations Committee which may adjust,
modify or otherwise amend the marks and grades for the unit, as may be required by SIBT policies. SIBT’s
Examinations Committee has a set of guidelines on the distribution of grades across the range from Fail to High
Distinction. Final results will include a grade.
Grade
Range
Description
HD High Distinction 85 -100 Complete and comprehensive understanding of the unit content;
development of relevant skills to a comprehensive level;
demonstration of insight in interpretation, analysis and intellectual
initiative; and achievement of all major and minor objectives of the
unit.
D Distinction 75-84 Very high level of understanding of the course unit; development of
relevant skills to a very high level; demonstration of a very high level
of interpretive and analytical ability and intellectual initiative; and
achievement of all major and minor objectives of the unit.
CR Credit 65-74 High level of understanding of unit content development of relevant
skills to a high level; demonstration of a high level of interpretive and
analytical ability; and achievement of all major objectives of the unit;
some minor objectives not fully achieved
P Pass 50-64 Adequate understanding of most of the basic unit content;
development of relevant skills to a satisfactory level; adequate
interpretive and analytical ability; and achievement of all major
objectives of the unit; some minor objectives not achieved.
F Fail 0-49 An unsatisfactory quality of performance or standard of learning
achievement. There was evidence of achievement of desired learning
outcomes below the passing standard.
S Satisfactory 50-100
Provides evidence of achievement of the learning outcomes, within
the context of a Pass/Fail unit
Note that your raw coursework cannot be used directly to calculate your standardized mark or to determine your
final grade. The process of assigning grades involves moderating the performance indicated by your raw scores
against the academic standards.
Unit Guide: COMM150 Culture, Media and Communication
Implementation Date: Session 3 2017
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3.4 Improvements based on feedback
Student feedback plays a vital role in improving the quality and educational effectiveness of SIBT units and in
ensuring academic staff keep in touch with student needs. Each session you may be given the opportunity to
complete a Student Evaluation of Unit (SEU) questionnaire to assess the unit. You may also have the opportunity
to complete a Student Evaluation on Teaching (SET) questionnaire to provide feedback on individual teaching
staff.
SIBT values student feedback in order to improve the quality of its educational programs. As well as the student
feedback, SIBT also instigates improvements based on other feedback by the Unit Supervisor and Teaching
staff.
3.5 Attendance
For you to be successful in this unit, it is an SIBT requirement that you participate in scheduled activities. There
are regular on-campus sessions and activities in our online space, the SIBT Learning Site. To ensure that your
academic performance is maintained, attendance is recorded electronically for each class.
For more information, refer to SIBT’s Attendance Policy and Course Progression policy on the SIBT Learning
Site: http://www.sibt.nsw.edu.au/policies
3.6 Academic Honesty
SIBT students are expected to read and comply with the SIBT Academic Honesty Policy and the SIBT Code of
Conduct. These can both be found in the Policy Library on the SIBT website. This means that:
 all academic work claimed as original is the work of the author making the claim;
 all academic collaborations are acknowledged;
 academic work is not falsified in any way;
 when the ideas of others are used, these ideas are acknowledged appropriately;
 students are expected to behave honestly during examinations.
For more information refer to SIBT’s Academic Honesty Policy and the SIBT Code of Conduct on the SIBT
Learning Site: http://www.sibt.nsw.edu.au/policies

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